Creon Of Antigone

Antigone: Divine Law Vs. Human Law
Antigone: Divine Law Vs. Human Law
Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law Anonymous The play entitled Antigone was written by a man named Sophocles, a scholarly author of philosophy and logic. The play Antigone is probably one of the most prominent interpretations of a tragic drama. The two main characters of the play are Antigone and Creon. There is much conflict between Antigone and Creon throughout the play, both of them having their own ideas and opinions regarding divine law versus human law. The theme that I am going to analyze
Theme In Antigone
Theme In Antigone
Theme in Antigone Anonymous Antigone, by Sophocles, is a play that has three major themes. All three of these themes play a very important part in this play. The three major themes are fate, love, and pride. Oedipus had killed his father, king of Thebes, not knowing it was his father and then took over Thebes. He married Iocaste, queen of Thebes (his mother), and had four children; one was a girl named Antigone. When Oedipus had figured out who he was and what he had done he moved away and cut o
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Anonymous Antigone did the right thing by defileing Creon's strict orders on burying Polynices because the unalterable laws of the gods and our morals are higher than the blasphemous laws of man. Creon gave strict orders not to bury Polynices because he lead a rebellion, which turned to rout, in Thebes against Creon, their omnipotent king. Antigone could not bare to watch her brother become consumed by vultures' talons and dogs. Creon finds out that somebody buried Polynices' body and s
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Anonymous The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continue on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this work by Sophocles. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She would seem to fit the part in light of the fact that she dies in doing
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Daniel Baranowski This poem is quite successful in getting the plot across to the reader. Unfortunatly, that is all he can get across because of his beleif that, inside every fat book is a skinny book trying to get out. Sargoff cannot have character descriptions, themes, or any real detail in his skinny book because of his beleifs. Sargoff leaves off why Polynices should not be burried and why his brother, who is not even menchoned, can be burried. This is important to building the
How The Choices Of The Characters Affected Each Other
How The Choices Of The Characters Affected Each Other
How the Choices of the Characters Affected Each Other Meagan In everyday life, the outcome of your day can be altered by the simplest or most complicating choices. Antigone's decision to bury her brother, Creon's choice to sentence Antigone to death, and again Antigone's choice to end her life were important decisions that other characters based their conclusions around. The choices of the characters in Antigone change the outcome of the play and the lives or choices of other characters. The fam
Empathy For Characters In Sophocles Antigone
Empathy For Characters In Sophocles Antigone
Empathy for Characters in Sophocle's Antigone Clare Waldron Sophocle's tragic play Antigone, written in 441 BC, is a theatrical piece of drama in which an audience is compelled to empathize with its character's. When empathizing with characters in Antigone the audience can, in imaginative and cognitive ways, participate in the understanding of a character's feelings, ideas as well as their situations. Antigone, Creon and Ismene all struggle with decisions that concern the laws of their city and
Antigone: Gender Issues
Antigone: Gender Issues
Antigone: Gender Issues Anonymous One of the most devastating problems for the Classical Greeks was the women's issue. Women in Classical Greece were not citizens, held no property, and indeed were not even allowed out of the house except under guard. Their status differed from that of the slaves of Greece only in name. This alone, however was not a problem -- the problem was that the Greeks knew, in their hearts, that this was wrong. Indeed, their playwrights harangued them about it from the st
Gender Issues In Antigone
Gender Issues In Antigone
Gender Issues in Antigone Anonymous One of the most devastating problems for the Classical Greeks was the women's issue. Women in Classical Greece were not citizens, held no property, and indeed were not even allowed out of the house except under guard. Their status differed from that of the slaves of Greece only in name. This alone, however was not a problem -- the problem was that the Greeks knew, in their hearts, that this was wrong. Indeed, their playwrights harangued them about it from the
Ancient Greek Drama
Ancient Greek Drama
Ancient Greek Drama sh0rt1 ORIGINS OF ANCIENT GREEK DRAMA Theater was born in Attica, an Ionic region of Greece. It originated from the ceremonial orgies of Dionysos but soon enough its fields of interest spread to various myths along with historic facts. As ancient drama was an institution of Democracy, the great tragic poets Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides as well as the comedian Aristophanes elevated public debate and political criticism to a level of aesthetic achievement. Euripides and the
The True Tragic Hero In Sophocles Antigone
The True Tragic Hero In Sophocles Antigone
The True Tragic Hero in Sophocles' Antigone John Fitzgerald In Master Sophocles' Antigone, the question of who the tragic hero really is has been a subject of debate for a great number years. Creon does possess some of the qualities that constitute a tragic hero but unfortunately does not completely fit into the role. Antigone, however, possesses all the aspects of a tragic hero. These are, in no particular order, having a high social position, not being overly good or bad, being tenacious in th
poetry
poetry
The Chorus reacts to events as they happen, generally in a predictable, though not consistent, way. It generally expresses a longing for calm and stability. For example, in Oedipus the King, it asks Oedipus not to banish Creon (725?733); fearing a curse, it attempts to send Oedipus out of Colonus in Oedipus at Colonus (242?251); and it questions the wisdom of Antigone?s actions in Antigone (909?962). In moments like these, the Chorus seeks to maintain the status quo, which is generally seen to