Abstract
This paper examines the early role of teacher approach, child?s motivation, and timing sets the mathematic ability in early childhood. Approximately 6% of children in the United States demonstrated poor performance on mathematics. Finding show that, teacher?s attitude and communication stimulates the learning environment of mathematics for young children. Children need to be ready emotionally to obtain an effective learning experience. Children who are confident and highly motivated tend to perform well even if the task was difficult. Giving children time to practice and master the skills are needed to move onto the next stage.













Approximately 6% of children in the United States demonstrated poor performance on mathematics (Siegler and Alibali, 2005). Mathematic is challenging to most young children. Some of the concerns on poor mathematic achievements are poorly prepare teachers, poor foundation and lack of motivations for the child to participate in mathematics (Chard et al., 2008). This paper examines the early role of teacher approach, child?s motivation, and timing sets the mathematic ability in early childhood. The early childhood years are critical period for cognitive development in academic skills such as attention, focus, and retrieval skills (Graziano et al., 2006). Teaching approach and the introduction manners of mathematics to young children affects their mathematic abilities. The child?s motivation in learning mathematics and solving problems play a crucial role in the process of obtaining mathematic understandings. Motivation and self-esteem also play a large role of keeping children interested and learning mathematics. Every child has the potential in learning mathematics, it?s the role of teacher and child motivation, value and confident which sets the mathematic ability during the years of early childhood.
The teacher?s attitude and communication stimulates the learning environment of mathematics for young children. The power of an internal mathematic environment of the classroom presented by the personal quality of the teachers, such as their values, beliefs and attitude towards sets the mathematic environments for young children (Aunola et al., 2006; Varol and Farran, 2006). Studies have shown a strong correlation between positive teaching approach and increase academic achievements (Varol and Farran, 2006). First, teachers must understand child cognitive development and stages in order to provide an effective learning environment (Varol and Farran, 2006; Sieler and Alibali, 2005). It is critical for teacher to practice careful observations on the child?s academic level to plan an effective and appropriate developmental level lesson on mathematics (Shipley, 2008; Varol and Farran, 2006). The Kumon method values this teaching approach because it also begins by performing a variety of test to measure the child?s mathematic level (Biederman, 2000). The Kumon?s values and philosophy is finding out the child?s developmental level in math regardless of the child?s age and start teaching the child at its developmental level (Kumon North America, 2008).
Teachers are encouraged to use consistency and fellow up on the use of new mathematical terminologies for young children. Lansdell (1999) pointed out that an important part of teaching mathematic to young children is making sure that children understand the new mathematic vocabulary and its concept. Studies showed that misunderstanding of mathematic terms and concept at the beginning will cause later problems in mathematic achievements (Lansdell, 1999). The use of vocabulary needs to be consistent for young children throughout the lesson to prevent confusion (Lansdell, 1999). Lansdell (1999) suggested that teacher should fellow up with the child?s use of the terminology and correct the child as early as possible for them to grasp a strong mathematic foundation in terminology and words to use.
Schwartz and Brown pointed out that it is effective to catch children thinking about math. Often when teaching young kindergarten about mathematics, it?s hard to teach them the meaning and observe weather they understand the mathematical concept or not (Schwartz and Brown, 1995; and Lansdell, 1999). Schwartz and Brown (1995) suggested on the spot learning ? when the child touch upon mathematic concepts, the teacher should use this chance to educate child?s understanding further. Further researchs agreed that young children?s understanding in mathematics take place by practicing concrete and authentic mathematic settings (Schwartz and Brown, 2005; Varol and Farran, 2006). Researchers pointed out the usage of mathematic tools (concrete materials) as essential resource in fostering young children?s mind in understanding mathematics as it would support different learning styles (Varol and Farran, 2006; Schwartz, 1995). Thus, by demonstrating positive teaching approach and setting a solid mathematic foundation would promote confident