Mantas Svabauskas
NAMS 1112
Justin Parks
December 4, 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS
TOC \o "1-3" \h \z \u 1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. REASON BEHIND AND THE AFTERMATH OF TRANSATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE 2
2.1 REASON BEHIND THE SLAVE TRADE 2
2.2 TIME PERIOD DURING THE SLAVERY TRANSACTIONS 5
2.3 AFTERMATH OF TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE 9
5.CONCLUSION 13
5. LIST OF REFERENCES 14


Reason behind and the Aftermath of Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
1. INTRODUCTION
Slavery is one of the earliest known econ omic systems, which existed in many cultures. When we look back on certain historical periods, we can see that it was one of the essential parts in the formation of The United States industry and economic growth. Regardless of the origin, race, time period or national culture, slavery is a defining concept in which human beings are held against their own will. Slavery is demeaning, and still exists in some parts of the world. Most significantly, there is one concept which has been historically one of the longest lasting - the Trans-Atlantic African slave trade. This far-reaching and forceful migration laid the foundation for new cultures and races to integrate within the society of the United States. Today the population of African Americans grows vigorously all over the United States. However, the first settlers of this race did not arrive in the Americas on their own free will.
Slavery is mostly thought to be the diverse actions these people perform under the supervision of their masters. Particular instances of jobs slaves were supposed to handle included manufacturing, mining, farming , house serving and working in factories. Without the help of slaves, the major connecting links in the North America's continent, such as transcontinental Railroad would probably never have been built as they were, or, possibly, they never would have been finished at all. The fatiguing work America's slaves contributed to the time period left a significant trace, which is now known around the globe. Many jobs the slaves were assigned to involved high risk, and often resulted in death caused by various diseases, injuries or simply by harsh working conditions and climate. By the mid 19 th century, African slaves provided up to 50% of the whole work force needed in certain states. The completion of the southern railroads provided many benefits to the areas it was directly linked with. Without the railways, transactions between numerous countries would be a very long lasting and demanding process, with ships required to travel completely around the continental land areas, instead of trains making a shortcut and delivering the goods with the full access that they have today.
The aim of this paper is to discuss and analyse in detail the slave trade that took place across the Atlantic Ocean from the 16 th through to the 19 th centuries. This research paper is divided into three major parts. The first part investigates the reasons behind the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and points out the possible motives. The second part describes the living and working conditions of African American slaves during the period of the slave transactions. Finally, the third part highlights the results of those transactions around the globe, and especially in Africa after slavery was significantly reduced.
2.1 REASON BEHIND THE SLAVE TRADE
The South Atlantic industrial system was concentrated on producing clothing and other goods to ship back to Europe. Therefore, it raised the number of African slaves brought to the New World. It was essential for those European countries which in later ages were striving to compete with each other to establish overseas empires. It is necessary to comprehend the process of transformation of the slavery in order to understand the importance of it. Slavery itself began around the year of 1440 when first African people, so-called "apprentices for life" were imported to the British colonies. From the 16th century and on, those slaves and even their descendants were legally becoming the property of their masters. As they were staying in possession of their owners, slaves were compared to merchandise or units of labour and sold in the local marketplaces along with other trade goods. By the time of mid-fifteenth century, the Portuguese were the first, whose ships sailed down the