Jerline Ridges
Sociology
18 th November 2016

Fahrenheit 451
Society can be such a beautiful, but it can also be very ugly as well. Today, it is quite ugly. We live in a time that is very similar to the story of Ray Bradbury\'s infamous novel Fahrenheit 451. In our society, today we live in a world full of distractions.
In our shocking reality author Ray Bradbury, had predicted our future that; men don\'t think for themselves but instead have television and the government think for us. The sociological problem is the United States is often looked upon as lazy and dumb. In the past three decades, the United States was leading in quantity and quality in high school diplomas, The United States is currently ranked at 36 th . " If you hide your ignorance, no one will hit you and you\'ll never learn. " (Bradbury).
The thing American society needs to learn is that society has been programmed to lose its very own individualism. " Cram them full of non-combustible data, chock them so damned full of \'facts\' they feel stuffed, but absolutely \'brilliant\' with information. Then they\'ll feel they\'re thinking, they\'ll get a sense of motion without moving. And they\'ll be happy, because facts of that sort don\'t change. Don\'t give them any slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy. " (Bradbury).
The passage shows that the plan was accomplished through the work of censorship. Much like our society the government wants its people to think a certain way. It\'s a tyrannical system that is in a "democratic country". " Oh God, the terrible tyranny of the majority. We all have our harps to play. And it\'s up to you to know with which ear you\'ll listen " (Bradbury). Much like our own society the government wants us to remain uninformed about what is going on and to censoring us.
American society has become "politically correct" to try and not offend anyone. Being politically correct has its advantages but the results just makes things perceived as sensitive in the long run. In the American society, it is easy for people to get offended over the smallest things. It is common that the people have been taking things and over exaggerating the subject, so in our society we do our best to say things in a politer way and tell people what they want to hear instead of what they need to hear. If you don\'t want a man unhappy politically, don\'t give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none. Let him forget there is such a thing as war. If the government is inefficient, top-heavy, and tax-mad, better it be all those than that people worry over it. Peace, Montag. Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs or the names of state capitals or how much corn Iowa grew last year. Cram them full of noncombustible data, chock them so damned full of \'facts\' they feel stuffed, but absolutely \'brilliant\' with information. Then they\'ll feel they\'re thinking, they\'ll get a sense of motion without moving. And they\'ll be happy, because facts of that sort don\'t change ." (Bradbury). Much like the novel we must censor ourselves in what we say, think, and act to fit in the government\'s "world".
Technology has advanced in ways that we cannot measure to our very own personal benefit. Cell phones are the new PCs due their great features ranging from; providing internet access, social media, playing music and many more features, in just society everywhere that has technology we are all tapped into our phones. The world has lost the true meaning of communications. " Nobody listens anymore. I can\'t talk to the walls because they\'re yelling at me, I can\'t talk to my wife; she listens to the walls. I just want someone to hear what I have to say. And maybe if I talk long enough it\'ll make sense. And I want you to teach me to understand what I read. " (Bradbury).
As a human race, we have lost the inability to talk to those in the same room