A Story about College

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Leaving from home and exploring ones own dreams are a very important part of maturing. Though, the physical separation from home is for some a difficult transition to college life. What are those things one takes for granted while living at home, and attending high school? What changes does one face upon entering college?

Just think of all the times the alarm clock did not go off, and mom was there to make sure school was still reached on time. When the alarm clock fails to go off at college, then the first class of the day is simply missed. At home breakfast is made to order: eggs, bacon, pancakes, or even French toast. In college one finds a particular meal that is edible, and must stick with it. A cabinet could be opened at home and a variety of tasty foods are readily available. In college a meal card is swiped though a machine upon entering the cafeteria, and the word "tasty" rarely enters the mind. Mom is at home to make sure the dishes are put away after the meal by everyone; dish duty is passed along each night. The tray is simply handed over to pairs of hands waiting to clean the dishes at college. Nutrition is a factor at home, and Mom creates meals with that in mind. A new food group sprang to life upon entering a residence hall: Mountain Dew, Doritos, Ben & Jerry's, Ho-Ho! 's, Oreos, the list could go on and on.

Privacy is always available at home; there is somewhere to read, write, listen to music, or to just rest. Dorm life is a harsh reality to college, and the only time the room is empty is on a Thursday night. At home a bedroom is somewhere to keep all personal belongings; there is a particular space for everything to fit. Space efficiency becomes a survival tactic in college. When at home there is no worry of someone coming into the bedroom unless permission is given to enter. In college a day without at least ten random visitors is considered boring.

At home, family was the only people living inside the house. In college the entire floor becomes family. The phone is the link of communication between friends in high school; e-mail becomes a second language in college. Conversations at home are often revolve around the evening news; while at school, it is totally the opposite. For the college student Western Europe could be wiped out by a horrible plague and no one would ever know, but last week's entire episode of "The Simpsons" could be recited. During high school it was a chore to walk outside to the mailbox; besides there was nothing but bills there anyway. Each college student has their mailbox with a combination, and going to the mailbox was never an ego booster or breaker before. There is newfound competition in the number, and size of parcels received each day.

In high school going to bed at midnight is late; asleep by 2:30 a.m. is an early night in college. At home a bed is somewhere to sleep, where in college it turns into a desk, table, couch, and anything else one can imagine. A bed is a comfy, big, relaxing object at home. In college they said the beds were extra long, but they did not say they were extra narrow. The front door was rarely locked at home, and if it was there was always a hidden key. Keys have never been so important than at college, and they seem to be lost more than ever before.

The closet at home always seemed a little on the small side; in college the closets seem big until it is realized they are supposed to fit everything you own inside them. Clothes were limited at home, unless a sibling had a similar taste and size. The closet seems to stretch down the entire hall in college, with an endless supply of clothes fitting every style and size. Laundry is done without any thought at home; mom just picks it up and it arrives back to the room clean, and folded nicely on the bed. Quarters are like gold in college. The laundry piles up inside the room until it becomes impossible to pass without falling, and then one has to resort to actually